Who we are

A network of innovators and professionals

Our philosophy

Diabetes Africa helps healthcare professionals, entrepreneurs and decision-makers reach more people and make a greater impact fighting diabetes in Africa and around the world.

We find people, organisations and initiatives that are changing patients’ lives, in Africa and around the world. We connect healthcare professionals, start-ups, established businesses, research institutions, non-profit organisations, governments and collectively tackle diabetes and related diseases.
We share information and knowledge in engaging ways. With continuous upskilling and communications at the heart of our activities, we work to make Africa the place where innovation in diabetes diagnostic and treatment originates and is best shared.

About

The challenge

The prevalence of diabetes and associated chronic diseases in emerging countries, and particularly in Africa, is high, but the exact figures are largely unknown. 

Estimates range from 5-20% across various groups and observational information point towards an upward trend, accelerated by urbanisation and the rise in living standards. Public infrastructure and healthcare expenditures are lagging behind, and the institutional focus on non-communicable diseases is only recent.  The structure of healthcare, as well as local and cultural specificities are not always considered in discourses related to diabetes, even though they affect diagnosis and care. 

Without leveraging energies more widely, across geographies and industries, the impact of diabetes will continue to wreck havoc on the economies of the continent. 

How we work

Since our creation in 2019 we seek to identify and promote innovation and innovators by leveraging a network of professionals and experts active around the world. Our fast growing membership includes 800+ healthcare professionals and business executives. We welcome the contribution of champions and partners interested in giving a voice to diabetes innovators and supporting our activities.

The work programme of Diabetes Africa is reviewed by a Council of Advisers comprising sector specialists from Africa and the rest of the world. Its business function is overseen by external non-profit and management experts.

Promoting existing initiatives

We identify and promote good initiatives that have made an impact and highlight the work of our partners in the fight against diabetes across Africa and around the world.

Identifying gaps

We identify gaps in knowledge and practice and seek to address them with our community. We seek to learn from each other and ask ‘why?’. We are open to new ideas and ways of working.

Creating coalitions

We create coalitions because they strengthen the impact we can have on diabetes. Everyone has a role to play, whether they are healthcare professionals, entrepreneurs, business executives, representative from non-profit organisation,  governments and people with diabetes.

Communicating with impact

Whether through our communication or through our work, we seek to reach a maximum number of people, because time is short and our work can save lives.

Striving for excellence

We conduct ourselves professionally, and apply good and best practices in all our activities. We seek to learn, improve and deliver excellence through what we do, how we behave and what we say.

Encouraging African solutions

We encourage African solutions and leadership and look for feedback from all players on the ground. Because great ideas are nothing without practical implementation.

People

Launched in 2019, Diabetes Africa seeks to identify and promote innovation and innovators by leveraging a network of professionals and experts active around the world. Our fast growing membership includes 800+ healthcare professionals and business executives. We welcome the contribution of champions and partners interested in giving a voice to diabetes innovators and supporting our activities.

The work programme of Diabetes Africa is reviewed by a Council of Advisers comprising sector specialists from Africa and the rest of the world. Its business function is overseen by external non-profit and management experts.

Structure

Our work is organised around interest groups called faculties and chambers. Faculties exist to facilitate access to professional development resources that are specific to Africa. Chambers help put forward and implement policy recommendations and high-impact projects to address structural issues facing diabetes diagnosis and care. 

Faculty

/ˈfak(ə)lti/

noun. A pan-African home for people who are fighting diabetes in their personal or professional lives and want to improve their knowledge and skills.

Chamber

/ˈtʃeɪmbə/

noun. A multidisciplinary think-tank that designs, implements and monitors projects and strategies to improve diabetes diagnosis and care in Africa.

Faculties
Endocrinology / diabetology

What are the pathways to train for diabetes specialty in Africa? How do endocrinologists build a stable practice with limited resources?

Faculties
Eye care

How can ophtalmologists, optometrists, opticians and eye surgeons identify and treat diabetes-related retinopathies and provide reliable advice?

Faculties
Foot care

Podiatry is not a well understood and well-developped specialty across Africa. What are the basics and how can we upskill professionals across the continent?

Faculties
Pharmacy

Pharmacies are often the first point of call for people living with diabetes in Africa. What advice should pharmacists provide and how could they better accompany patients in their journey?

Faculties
Nutrition

Adequate nutrition is important to limit complications related to Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. What does this it mean in an African context and how can nutritionists help patients navigate the plethora of information and advice they receive?

Faculties
Psychology

Understanding and influencing the formation of lifestyle habits, supporting adherence to treatment… Psychology can play a role to improve outcomes for patients. How can knowledge in this field be better shared and support the work of other healthcare professionals?

Faculties
Nursing

Nurses are on the frontline of the battle against diabetes, but there is often little incentive for them to gain additional knowledge on the disease and related topics. This faculty offers a platform for nurses to exchange information gain recognition for the way they impact the lives of people with diabetes in a positive way.

Faculties
People with diabetes

With access to online content and social media, people with diabetes can play an important role in managing their own condition as well as informing others. How can these ‘super patients’ improve and share their skills and knowledge better?

Faculties
Diabetes education

Patient education is an integral part of diabetes care. Without trained educators, this responsibility lies with other professionals who will have less resources to dedicate to their specialty.

Faculties
Non-profit excellence

Non-profit organisations, associations and patient organisations can learn from each other and identify ways to increase their impact within their own geographical areas of interest. 

Faculties
Endocrinology / diabetology

What are the pathways to train for diabetes specialty in Africa? How do endocrinologists build a stable practice with limited resources?

Faculties
Eye care

How can ophtalmologists, optometrists, opticians and eye surgeons identify and treat diabetes-related retinopathies and provide reliable advice?

Faculties
Foot care

Podiatry is not a well understood and well-developped specialty across Africa. What are the basics and how can we upskill professionals across the continent?

Faculties
Pharmacy

Pharmacies are often the first point of call for people living with diabetes in Africa. What advice should pharmacists provide and how could they better accompany patients in their journey?

Faculties
Nutrition

Adequate nutrition is important to limit complications related to Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. What does this it mean in an African context and how can nutritionists help patients navigate the plethora of information and advice they receive?

Faculties
Psychology

Understanding and influencing the formation of lifestyle habits, supporting adherence to treatment… Psychology can play a role to improve outcomes for patients. How can knowledge in this field be better shared and support the work of other healthcare professionals?

Faculties
Nursing

Nurses are on the frontline of the battle against diabetes, but there is often little incentive for them to gain additional knowledge on the disease and related topics. This faculty offers a platform for nurses to exchange information gain recognition for the way they impact the lives of people with diabetes in a positive way.

Faculties
People with diabetes

With access to online content and social media, people with diabetes can play an important role in managing their own condition as well as informing others. How can these ‘super patients’ improve and share their skills and knowledge better?

Faculties
Diabetes education

Patient education is an integral part of diabetes care. Without trained educators, this responsibility lies with other professionals who will have less resources to dedicate to their specialty.

Faculties
Non-profit excellence

Non-profit organisations, associations and patient organisations can learn from each other and identify ways to increase their impact within their own geographical areas of interest. 

Faculties
Endocrinology / diabetology

What are the pathways to train for diabetes specialty in Africa? How do endocrinologists build a stable practice with limited resources?

Faculties
Eye care

How can ophtalmologists, optometrists, opticians and eye surgeons identify and treat diabetes-related retinopathies and provide reliable advice?

Faculties
Foot care

Podiatry is not a well understood and well-developped specialty across Africa. What are the basics and how can we upskill professionals across the continent?

Faculties
Pharmacy

Pharmacies are often the first point of call for people living with diabetes in Africa. What advice should pharmacists provide and how could they better accompany patients in their journey?

Faculties
Nutrition

Adequate nutrition is important to limit complications related to Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. What does this it mean in an African context and how can nutritionists help patients navigate the plethora of information and advice they receive?

Faculties
Psychology

Understanding and influencing the formation of lifestyle habits, supporting adherence to treatment… Psychology can play a role to improve outcomes for patients. How can knowledge in this field be better shared and support the work of other healthcare professionals?

Faculties
Nursing

Nurses are on the frontline of the battle against diabetes, but there is often little incentive for them to gain additional knowledge on the disease and related topics. This faculty offers a platform for nurses to exchange information gain recognition for the way they impact the lives of people with diabetes in a positive way.

Faculties
People with diabetes

With access to online content and social media, people with diabetes can play an important role in managing their own condition as well as informing others. How can these ‘super patients’ improve and share their skills and knowledge better?

Faculties
Diabetes education

Patient education is an integral part of diabetes care. Without trained educators, this responsibility lies with other professionals who will have less resources to dedicate to their specialty.

Faculties
Non-profit excellence

Non-profit organisations, associations and patient organisations can learn from each other and identify ways to increase their impact within their own geographical areas of interest. 

Chambers

Chambers are designed to provide a platform to address Africa’s top diabetes challenges with a multidisciplinary, inclusive approach. Within a chamber, pro members can take part in projects that seek to identify and promote innovation. 

Teamwork

Each chamber meets to identify key questions that its members will tackle through projects. Multidisciplinary teams of members and partners, including external experts, design and carry out the projects.  Corporate and public champions can provide funding to support a project. 

Diabetes Africa_teamwork illustration
Diabetes Africa teamwork illustration (mobile)